We are very proud to share with you what our patients say about Meadowlands Hospital... Read more

“ICU and Med Surg Unit – everyone went above and beyond to keep me comfortable. They including the Respiratory aides were all good to me. Everyone took great care of me. Dietary staff was very pleasant. All the nurses were great and tended to my every need with a pleasant attitude. The doctors were great and was very informative and made me smile! Everyone at the Meadowlands Hospital was very nice to my family.”
— Susan S., Meadowlands Hospital HCAHPS/3West Patient, June 2017

“My nurses were amazing and the candlelight dinner was great! (MHMC staff) made sure my visitors were comfortable. Doctors always kept me informed of my son’s health. On discharge, nurses made sure I knew what I needed to take care of myself at home. I really loved my stay at this hospital.”
— Shanice R., Meadowlands Hospital HCAHPS/Postpartum Patient, April 2017

“All staff at the Meadowlands Hospital were concerned and helpful.”
— Mary C., Meadowlands Hospital Emergency Room Patient, July 2017

MHMC dedicated medical professionals, in combination with the modern emergency room facilities, allow us to provide quality care in a personal manner... Read more

As a patient, you can make your care safer by being an active, involved and informed member of your health care team... Read more

Anesthesia traditionally meant the condition of having sensation (including the feeling of pain) blocked or temporarily taken away. It is a pharmacologically induced and reversible state of amnesia, analgesia, loss of responsiveness, loss of skeletal muscle reflexes or decreased stress response, or all simultaneously. This allows patients to undergo surgery and other procedures without the distress and pain they would otherwise experience. An alternative definition is a "reversible lack of awareness," including a total lack of awareness (e.g. a general anesthetic) or a lack of awareness of a part of the body such as a spinal anesthetic.

Types of anesthesia include local anesthesia, regional anesthesia, general anesthesia, and dissociative anesthesia. Local anesthesia inhibits sensory perception within a specific location on the body, such as a tooth or the urinary bladder. Regional anesthesia renders a larger area of the body insensate by blocking transmission of nerve impulses between a part of the body and the spinal cord. Two frequently used types of regional anesthesia are spinal anesthesia and epidural anesthesia. General anesthesia refers to inhibition of sensory, motor and sympathetic nerve transmission at the level of the brain, resulting in unconsciousness and lack of sensation. Dissociative anesthesia uses agents that inhibit transmission of nerve impulses between higher centers of the brain (such as the cerebral cortex) and the lower centers, such as those found within the limbic system.